Fantasy Football: Rated PPR

by Tim Heaney on July 16, 2012 @ 10:53:00 PDT

 


Upon learning your fantasy football league carries point-per-reception scoring, you should immediately re-align your draft philosophy. Rule No. 1 in winning says to extract the most upside from your scoring system, after all.

The variance in valuation offered between standard scoring and PPR isn't quite as prominent in the elite positional tiers, at least those defined by Average Draft Position. Sure, Wes Welker shows more dominance in PPRs, but his typical placement doesn't vary all that much in standard parties.

Being in a reception-rewarding format, however, might change some of your priorities as you work your way deeper into your pick 'em. For example, you'd prefer having Jeremy Maclin in a PPR but might want to take the risk on grabbing DeSean Jackson first in normal combinations because of his big-play ability.

One-dimensional rumblers who aren't in on many passing downs, like Michael Turner, won't be as helpful in reception-registering formats and are therefore, all things equal, downgraded as opposed to the likes of, say, Reggie Bush, Steven Jackson or Ahmad Bradshaw.

Player touches don't translate as directly to more points in non-PPRs - many catch compilers can't break big plays and therefore often fail to deliver bigger payoffs in yardage-oriented leagues. The fact that every catch counts makes it more imperative to focus on the players that will touch the ball as often as possible. Targets and totes accentuate the boost that PPR gives.

Targets and touches

Not-so-explosive players look a little more attractive through PPR goggles. Increased work augments value in any situation, but the statistical impact is more drastic in PPRs compared to non- with those instant points. The more times they're sought out by their slinger, the more chances they'll get to record that elusive point for each snare.

Wes Welker, WR, New England Patriots
PPR's poster boy

Pegging how frequently a receiving option will be targeted - based on past tendencies and informed estimations of future involvement - is a solid tiebreaker in deciding between two different PPR commodities, during a draft or during a free-agent pickup period.

As we've seen, explosive wideouts don't necessarily have to be the most targeted to finish among fantasy football's best - especially in standard scoring - but it usually helps more often to be a more frequent earner of QB attention.

Our statistics analyzer and utilization tracker offer the freedom to sort these statistics. A sample of last year's wideout leaders:

WR target leaders, Wk 1-17, 2011

Rk
Player
Team
Targets
1
ATL
179
2
NE
173
3
DET
158
4
ARI
150
5
DEN/STL
150
6
KC
142
7
MIA
141
8
IND
134
9
BUF
133
10
NYG
133

* White was 2010's WR looks king, as well, with 184.

This confirms the listed bigger names here are "no duh" first- and second-rounders regardless of format. We'll be bringing you more throughout our Draft Guide on which direction players' target totals should be moving this season.

Which midrange players deserve extra attention in leagues that reward catches?

RB PPR boosts

Player
Team
Notes
C.J. Spiller
BUF
Fred Jackson tandem role enough for flex value
Jahvid Best
DET
With head health, he's top cat; you'll just have to do without GL work
Roy Helu
WAS
Tim Hightower, RB1? Don't buy it long term, even in Shanny backfield. Helu might only need 15 touches anyway
Ryan Williams
ARI
Beanie's complement could hog passing downs
Isaiah Pead
STL
Steven Jackson slowing down, Pead fits mold of swiping grabs from the vet
Ronnie Hillman
DEN
A new checkdown toy for Peyton Manning that could contribute regularly by November
Pierre Thomas
NO
Loaded backfield, Darren Sproles still king, but for depth, Thomas involved enough in pass game.
Jacquizz Rodgers
ATL
Michael Turner's duties to decrease, Dirk Koetter's O likes midrange tosses. Will Matt Ryan check down?
David Wilson
NYG
Could be a carousel, but explosive rook has fresh legs and could be the handcuff for Ahmad Bradshaw, not just a changeup
Bernard Scott
CIN
Unseasoned pass catcher but fits as new Danny Woodhead to BenJarvus Green-Ellis
Rashad Jennings
JAC
Speculation of Maurice Jones-Drew's decline cements Jennings' late-rounds allure. MJD might lose bell cow status.
Alex Green, Brandon Saine
GB
They like to pass. These backs can catch. Good combo for whoever earns lion's backup share
Joe McKnight
NYJ
Shonn Grenne plods. McKnight slashes.
Shane Vereen, Danny Woodhead
NE
If you're into frustrating guessing games and all

Longer shots

If the Oakland Raiders don't acquire another backup running back, Mike Goodson could build on the 40 catches he etched in part-time duty for Carolina in 2010. He's not a true 180 in style from Darren McFadden, but DMC's fragility always keeps the door at least minimally ajar for the backup to take over.

Javon Ringer seems like a mere handcuff to Chris Johnson, but given CJ2K's workload over the last few years, don't be surprised if Ringer becomes a fixture, if only for an increase in spell work.

Brandon Jackson is healthy and fits this West Coast outfit, but he'll need an injury from Trent Richardson to deploy his heave-hauling prowess at a rate frequent enough for fantasy owners to care. He also has, to some degree, Montario Hardesty and Chris Ogbonnaya nipping at his heels for Dawg Pound touches.

WR PPR boosts

Player
Team
Notes
Reggie Wayne, Austin Collie
IND
Andrew Luck should have plenty of midrange targets lined up for his receivers.
Nate Burleson
DET
DET throws plenty to keep the vet WR relevant, even if Titus Young usurps his role.
Lance Moore
NO
Doesn't break big plays, but NO will throw plenty, even in Bountygate season
Anquan Boldin
BAL
Format caters to possession ways
Eddie Royal
SD
Has great hands; has Malcom Floyd and Robert Meachem to get deep attention in pass-first attack
Mike Williams
TB
In Vincent Jackson, finally has competent field stretcher to let him cover the middle
Mario Manningham
SF
Is there enough room for him and Vernon Davis?
Davone Bess
MIA
Chain mover in Joe Philbin's O, if they get QB play, makes handy depth
Brandon LaFell
CAR
Big over-the-middle target to jell with Steve Smith; 3rd-year breakout candidate
Randall Cobb
GB
Raw but shifty, should eat more of Donald Driver's work as year goes on
Doug Baldwin
SEA
Should be safety valve for whichever QB wins the competition
Danny Amendola
STL
Mess at WR, but Amendola best slot option, so fairly safe
David Nelson
BUF
Not a speedster, but 6-foot-5 slot man can create mismatches
Leonard Hankerson
WAS
IF healthy enough to contribute, he's the 6-foot-2 Nelson
Harry Douglas
ATL
Can Dirk Koetter open things up for him, too?
Emmanuel Sanders
PIT
If knee holds up, opportunity to thrive in slot between Mike Wallace-Antonio Brown pair

The Gronk-Graham Effect

Tony Gonzalez, TE, Atlanta Falcons
Still valuable to PPR owners

With their standout 2011 campaigns, Rob Gronkowski and Jimmy Graham have changed the fantasy landscape on a smaller but just as impactful manner as the wide receiver shift has caused in recent seasons.

Tight ends that reached various reception levels, 2009-2011

Year
100-plus
90-99
80-89
70-79
60-69
50-59
Entries
2009
1
1
1
5
2
4
14
2010
0
1
0
3
4
5
13
2011
0
2
2
3
4
6
17


 

 

The speck of increase in the listed options shows the increasing importance of the tight end position in the leaguewide offensive attack.

Kellen Winslow and Tony Gonzalez are aging talents but still remain useful in snare-chronicling systems. There's a new class, however, coming to replace them as the biggest PPR pay-offs in the position's value class you can nab in the middle and late rounds:

TE PPR boosts

Player
Team
Notes
Brandon Pettigrew
DET
Best, Young might steal middle-field looks, but Pettigrew's a big target
Jermaine Gresham
CIN
Cincy's No. 2 behind A.J. Green
Jacob Tamme
DEN
A familiar face is taking DEN snaps, in case you forgot
Coby Fleener
IND
Feels like he's still in Palo Alto dorms with broski Andrew Luck
Lance Kendricks
STL
Simpler O with more time to learn it could build his rapport with Sam Bradford

 

Targets & Utilization | Stats Analyzer | Draft Guide

Facebook Twitter Google +

About Tim Heaney

Tim's work has been featured by USA Today/Sports Weekly, among numerous outlets, and recognized as a finalist in the Fantasy Sports Writers Association awards. The Boston University alum, who competes in the prestigious LABR and Tout Wars, has won numerous industry leagues in both baseball and football.

He appears frequently, including every Sunday, on Sirius XM Fantasy Sports Radio, as well as every Wednesday on 1570 AM WNST in Baltimore.

Don't miss these great reports....


What do you think? Sound off!



Recent KFFL releases